Grief and Loss Resources

Bereavement is the period of grief and mourning after a death. When you grieve, it's part of the normal process of reacting to a loss. You may experience grief as a mental, physical, social or emotional reaction.

There is no right way to grieve. It is an individual process and a natural part of life. Life won’t be the same after a loss, but experiencing your grief will allow you to adjust to life after loss.

Each of us takes their own journey through grief and healing. Allow yourself to open up to the idea that not every person experiences and deals with the loss of a loved one in the same way.

The Bereavement Coordinators facilitates and oversees the bereavement services provided. The bereavement team may include the Bereavement Coordinator, the Social Worker, the Chaplain, and Patient/Family Volunteer.

A team member, usually the Bereavement Coordinator, calls the caregiver following the patient’s death to offer condolences and offer support The caregiver will also receive information about our support groups, individual counseling opportunities, and other materials to provide support and encouragement. Our grief support groups are offered throughout the year.

Bereavement services are optional however if you decline services initially, you may change your mind later by calling the office for further assistants. Please keep in mind that shortly after a loved one’s death, some people feel that they are doing well but find that months later things may get rough. So, before deciding to decline bereavement follow-up, it may be a good idea to wait a few months.

Bereavement services are available free of charge to our family members, as well as members of the community.
 

Available Bereavement Services

  • Initial visit by Bereavement Coordinator
  • Quarterly bereavement contacts with monthly mailings
  • Grief education and counseling
  • Support groups for adults
  • Social support group gatherings
  • Yearly remembrance service
  • Access to a variety of materials through our library and resources

Resources


Final Gifts, by Maggie Callanan & Patrick Kelley

Lessons from the Dying, by Rodney Smith

The Courage To Grieve, by Judy Tatelbaum

Life is Goodbye, Life is Hello, by Alla Renee Bozarth

Motherless Daughters, by Hope Edelman

I Can’t Stop Crying, by John Martin and Frank Ferris

The Grieving Time, by Anne Brooks

What Helped Me When My Loved One Died,by Earl Grollman

A Grace Disguised: How a Soul Grows Through Loss,by Gerald Sittser

How to Survive the Loss of a Love, by Melba Colgrove

Life After Loss, by Bob Deits

A Broken Heart Still Beats: After Your Child Dies, by Anne McCracken And Mary Semel

The Worst Loss: How Families Heal from the Death of a Child, by Barbara D. Rosof

Safe Passage, by Molly Fumia

In My Mother’s Kitchen: An Introduction to the Healing Power of Reminiscence, by Robin Edgar

Living When a Loved One Has Died, by Earl Grollman

Surviving Grief...and Learning to Live Again, by Catherine Sanders

Swallowed by a Snake: The gift to the Masculine Side of Healing, by Thomas Golden

Keys to Helping Children Deal with Death and Grief, by Joy Johnson

Talking with Children About Loss, by Maria Trozzi with Kathy Mussinini

I Wasn’t Ready to Say Goodbye, by Brook Noel